Design Challenges for Mobile Devices

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edaForum05 Presentation

Friday Kenote Hermann Eul

Infineon Design Challenges for Mobile Devices



The ability to deliver new products and to grow our industry begins with the work of design engineers. With the accelerating pace of technology advances, simply maintaining engineers skills and knowledge is not enough to meet the challenges we face. The success of both the individual and the organization depends on continuous improvement in utilizing the latest techniques, available tools, and practical applications of theoretical knowledge.

Customer expectations for wireless devices are rising as mobility becomes a must-have feature for a growing number of consumer applications. In addition, the popularity of Wi-Fi and the emergence of WiMAX, alongside the growth in 3G networks, have created a demand for devices that can operate in diverse radio environments. Years of experience in designing mobile phones have built a solid base of knowledge for developing the next generation of mobile devices, but new challenges have also arisen. New products will require advances in RF and mixed-signal design, as well as power management.

This keynote speech will discuss how the complex design challenges can be addressed in the context of current and continuously evolving market requirements.


Hermann Eul Hermann Eul Member of the Management Board Head of Communication Business Group Infineon Technologies AG, Germany

Prof. Dr. Eul began his professional career with Siemens AG in 1991 after completing his studies in electrical engineering, joining the company s Telecommunications Infrastructure Division. By 1996 he was head of the Video and Audio ICs Division in the then Siemens Semiconductor Group. In 2001, after holding various other leading positions in the mobile communications segment, Eul took over as head of the Security & Chip Card ICs Group, which he led until the end of 2002. Afterwards, Eul was appointed by the University of Hanover, where he served as head of the Faculty of Radio Frequency Engineering and Wireless Systems.